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The Hatayama Code and The question of meaning - resistance and interpretation in short fiction as practice research

Author:

Jane Alexander

University of Edinburgh, GB
About Jane
Jane Alexander is director of prose fiction on the MSc in Creative Writing by online learning at the University of Edinburgh, and an associate lecturer in creative writing with The Open University. Her first novel The Last Treasure Hunt (Saraband, 2015) was selected as a Waterstones debut of the year, and her short fiction has won prizes and been widely published. She is the recipient of a Scottish Arts Council New Writers Bursary and a Creative Scotland research award, and in 2016 was awarded a Hawthornden International Writing Retreat Fellowship. Jane has recently completed a creative writing PhD at Northumbria University.
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Abstract

This article comprises a short story with critical-reflexive commentary. The story, ‘The Hatayama Code’, was composed as part of a doctoral thesis investigating the ways in which short fiction may be a particularly appropriate form for illuminating and interrogating human experiences of science and technology through the creation of uncanny affect. The accompanying commentary reflects on the status of the creative work as part of a methodology of knowledge production. Together, they demonstrate that the creative work supplies its own commentary on how it should be understood as practice research.
How to Cite: Alexander, J. (2019). The Hatayama Code and The question of meaning - resistance and interpretation in short fiction as practice research. Roundtable, 2(2), 4. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/rt.58
Published on 21 Nov 2019.
Peer Reviewed

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